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H. Steven Moffic, MD

H. Steven Moffic, MD

Dr Moffic is an editorial board member of and regular contributor to Psychiatric Times. After an award-filled career focusing on the underserved, he retired from clinical work and his Tenured Professorship at the Medical College of Wisconsin on June 30, 2012. He continues to write, present, and serve on boards devoted to this—and related—ethical concerns. Dr Moffic’s book, The Ethical Way: Challenges and Solutions for Managed Behavioral Healthcare (Jossey-Bass, 1997), was the first on the subject. He has edited ethics columns for 3 psychiatric newsletters.

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I don't know of anything like the film, "Voices." See it if you haven’t, and recommend it to others, too.

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Despite the disappearance of identity variations in diagnostic classifications, psychiatrists can contribute to solving social challenges.

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We have many tragic events that affect our collective grieving process. How should they be mourned over time?

So many had stared at John Nash, for different reasons, at different times. Now that his own stare is frozen in time, the challenge is to understand the meaning of the stares that he had received during his life.

If the models in this discussion are disseminated and used, costs will drop and patients will enjoy an improved quality of life.

“Those who fail to learn from the mistakes of their predecessors are destined to repeat them.” This may be the take-home point of the APA 2015 meeting regarding schizophrenia.

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Why is burnout seemingly rare in coaches but well over 40% in psychiatrists? H. Steven Moffic considers why life coaches have become big business while psychiatrists, stigmatized.

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In the spirit of Freud’s recommendation to free associate in psychoanalysis, perhaps we can be inspired to do whatever we can for freedom, human dignity, and the future of children.

“I may never know who you are,” writes this psychiatrist, “but if you provided medical or psychiatric care for the co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525, we are colleagues. And you too are his victims, of sorts. I hope your reputation does not suffer unduly.”

Should racism be considered a psychiatric disorder?

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