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H. Steven Moffic, MD

H. Steven Moffic, MD

Dr Moffic is an editorial board member of and regular contributor to Psychiatric Times. After an award-filled career focusing on the underserved, he retired from clinical work and his Tenured Professorship at the Medical College of Wisconsin on June 30, 2012. He continues to write, present, and serve on boards devoted to this—and related—ethical concerns. Dr Moffic’s book, The Ethical Way: Challenges and Solutions for Managed Behavioral Healthcare (Jossey-Bass, 1997), was the first on the subject. He has edited ethics columns for 3 psychiatric newsletters.

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To honor him beyond his professional skills, let us learn some important medical lessons from the life and death of Robin Williams.

A little bit of narcissism can make a leader. “Too much” can be a problem. On the nature of leadership from a psychological perspective.

The stories of two psychiatrists who died recently—one who passed away gently at the end of a long life; the other died violently, much too soon.

In addition to helping indiviiduals with PTSD, psychiatrists can play an active role in resolving trauma experienced by the country as a whole.

Whether Pope Francis has ever met with, or made a referral to, a psychiatrist, it is clear that he knows something essential about psychiatry.

Maybe psychiatry should take a lesson from a fashion designer -- and promote our messages to the public via billboards.

Clinicians have some degree of power. We must curb abuse—whether under the guise of research, transference in psychotherapy, in prescribing medication, or when deciding on treatments.

©Galyna Andrushko/shutterstock.com

By writing a series of profound pieces after he found out that he had a terminal illness, Oliver Sacks, MD, the renowned neurologist and writer, taught us much about how to live and die.

A story of what can happen (and has happened) when the expertise of a psychiatrist is not followed in complex cases that involve substance use and other disorders.

Organized psychiatry and psychology share a common acronym—APA. Some of our clinical work overlaps, but sometimes they differ in response to world events.


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