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Lynne I. Wagner, PhD

Lynne I. Wagner, PhD

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Cognitive impairment, including memory loss, inability to concentrate, and difficulty multitasking, has become a widely recognized possible late effect of chemotherapy and cancer treatment.

Fatigue, the most common symptom
reported by people with
cancer, is associated with functional
impairments and decrements in
quality of life. As Drs. Lipman and
Lawrence have pointed out, research
on the etiology of cancer-related fatigue
is scant. Morrow et al[1] conducted
a detailed review of the
evidence to support four hypotheses
for cancer-related fatigue and highlighted
independent findings that implicate
cytokines, 5-HT, and the
hypothalamic-pituitary axis in the development
of cancer-related fatigue.
Additional research is needed in this
area to articulate the pathophysiology
of fatigue and the associated clinical
implications.

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