ubmslatePT-logo-ubm

PT Mobile Logo

Topics:

History of Psychiatry

Welcome to the History Page

Greg Eghigian, PhD, Section Editor for Psychiatric Times History of Psychiatry, is Associate Professor of Modern History and former Director of the Science, Technology, and Society Program at Penn State University, University Park, Pa. He writes and teaches on the history of madness, mental illness, and mental health in the Western world. He is the editor and author of numerous books, most recently From Madness to Mental Health: Psychiatric Disorder and its Treatment in Western Civilization (Rutgers University Press; 2010). He is also co-editor of the scholarly blog, h-madness. For Dr Eghigian's author page, please click here.

 

History of Psychiatry

©Wallybird-Shutterstock

Playing helpless witness to a growing epidemic with no cure takes us back in time. The Hippocratics called it the “art” of medicine. It does not take a psychiatrist, however, to see that this “artful” approach frequently fails in public health crises.

Shrinks: The Untold Story of Psychiatry

The author of this book tells the story of the evolution of psychiatry from a place of skepticism and distain to its more recent emergence as a modern neuroscience.

It is clear that unless things change radically in the coming decades, psychiatry—like other branches of medicine—will have to accommodate itself to the effects of disruptions to existing ecosystems.

psychology of spiritual experience

Watchman Nee’s suggestion of a potential link between spirituality and mental health is no longer foreign to the field of psychiatry. Recent studies indicate that spiritual beliefs may have a positive effect on mental health.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

What do physicians intend by the term “disease”? The recent IOM report on “systemic exertion intolerance disease” (formerly known as chronic fatigue syndrome) casts this question in a new light and has many practical implications for patients, physicians, and third-party payers.

After years of working with troubled individuals claiming to have been abducted by extraterrestrials, Harvard University Professor John Mack published a book. What made Mack and the book so controversial was the fact that he had come to accept that his patients’ stories were an accurate description of real events.

Advances in psychiatric research, spanning the entire spectrum of biological, psychological, and social aspects of mental processes and functions, have transformed the field of psychiatry. More in this inaugural piece by Psychiatric Times' Editor in Chief.

Pages

Subscribe to History of Psychiatry on [sitename]

CME Center

Earn CME Credits for reading Psychiatric Times articles. Click here to go to our free online CME activities.

By clicking Accept, you agree to become a member of the UBM Medica Community.