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The Federal Government Ignores the Treatment Needs of Americans With Serious Mental Illness: Page 2 of 2

The Federal Government Ignores the Treatment Needs of Americans With Serious Mental Illness: Page 2 of 2

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What’s needed?

What is needed is an agency soul-searching and a re-prioritization that places the treatment of serious mental disorders at the very top of the list of agency goals. SAMHSA needs leadership that acknowledges the importance of addressing serious mental illness. Initiatives that provide funding for new approaches to engaging the seriously mentally ill; for assisted outpatient treatment with enriched psychosocial services; and for additional psychiatric hospital beds, particularly for longer-term care given the severe shortage of such resources in the US, should be at the top of SAMHSA’s agenda.

Clinical education programs that address current, evidence-based treatment for serious mental illness, and new funding for the training of mental health professionals, including psychiatrists, advanced practice psychiatric nurses, and psychologists, should be a major focus. SAMHSA should develop closer ties with the National Institute of Mental Health, which is helping us to better understand the neurobiological underpinnings of mental illness every day. The real hope, change and ability to recover from these disorders, lies in their effective treatment. To ignore this is to leave a large segment of some of the most seriously ill in our society abandoned—indeed, discriminated against by the very agency charged with serving them.

What can be done to change the current course? Stakeholder groups that seek to ensure psychiatric treatment for all who need it should band together and exert pressure on SAMHSA, on political administrations, and on congressional representatives to address the needs of the seriously mentally ill. Skilled behavioral health providers with patient care experience—psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, counselors—should consider committing a period of service to SAMHSA and to other federal agencies to inform policy decisions related to substance use and mental disorders. This is especially important because too many in the government have education in behavioral health fields but have never worked with patients, or if they have, it was many years in the past. Being inside the Beltway also imbues an artificial perspective that may be informed by lobbyists if at all. This does not serve the American people.

Time for change

I left SAMHSA after 2 years. It became increasingly uncomfortable to be associated with an agency that, for the most part, refused to support evidence-based psychiatric treatment of mental disorders. It was also quite clear that the psychiatric perspective I brought—inclusive of assessment, diagnosis of mental disorders, utilization of evidence-based treatments, including psychotropic medication and psychosocial interventions as integral components of recovery—was a poor fit for the agency. SAMHSA needs a complete review and overhaul of its current mission, leadership, and funded programs. Congress should quickly address this through legislative mandate.

For too long the treatment needs of the seriously mentally ill have been ignored by SAMHSA, and this needs to change. In doing so, perhaps people like the woman in the doorway will be able to move out of the shadows to live full and productive lives in our communities.

Editor's note: The opinions or assertions presented here are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect those of Psychiatric Times or its editorial board. Comments not followed by full names and academic titles will either be removed or heavily monitored. –Psychiatric Times

 

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Disclosures

Dr McCance-Katz was formerly Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco; currently she is Chief Medical Officer for the Rhode Island Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Hospitals. She is also Chief Medical Officer and Acting Chief Executive Officer of the Eleanor Slater Hospital in Cranston, Rhode Island. She reports no conflicts of interest concerning the subject matter of this article.

References

1. US Department of Health and Human Services. Results from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings. http://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUHmhfr2013/NSDUHmhfr2013.pdf. Accessed February 23, 2016.

2. HHS.gov. HHS FY 2016 Budget in Brief. http://www.hhs.gov/about/budget/budget-in-brief/samhsa/index.html. Accessed February 23, 2016.

 
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