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Disaster Psychiatry

Disaster Psychiatry

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We have many tragic events that affect our collective grieving process. How should they be mourned over time?

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Playing helpless witness to a growing epidemic with no cure takes us back in time. The Hippocratics called it the “art” of medicine. It does not take a psychiatrist, however, to see that this “artful” approach frequently fails in public health crises.

Suicide, Violence, and Mental Illness

Professions, psychiatry included, do not have a stellar record of protecting those they serve. Do we have reason to believe that professional organizations or corporate entities can be trusted to protect their clientele?

In this article, psychodynamic psychology is applied toward the understanding and recognition of "homegrown" terrorists, individuals who are familiar with American culture and thus more difficult to detect.

“I may never know who you are,” writes this psychiatrist, “but if you provided medical or psychiatric care for the co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525, we are colleagues. And you too are his victims, of sorts. I hope your reputation does not suffer unduly.”

Today, we embrace the collective experiences of our fellow members of the human race, this Holocaust Remembrance Day and 70th Anniversary of Auschwitz liberation.

A commentary on civility and ethical standards in the aftermath of terrorist events in France.

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