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Eating Disorders in 4 Clinical Reports

Eating Disorders in 4 Clinical Reports


  • Working With Patients Who Have Eating Disorders
    Not all eating disorders are alike but they do have one thing in common. They are second only to substance use disorders as the deadliest of all psychiatric illnesses. Special Report Chair Pauline Powers, MD introduces this collection that provides specific, effective interventions for these debilitating disorders.


  • Neurobiology of Eating Disorders
    An area of great research interest that holds hope both for understanding the perplexing nature of eating disorders and, perhaps, identifying more effective treatments.


  • Significance for the practicing psychiatrist: Neuroimaging research suggests eating disorder symptoms may result from dysfunction in circuits underlying reward and inhibition. For a mobile-friendly view of the Monarch Notes, click here.


  • Nutritional Needs of Patients With Eating Disorders
    Christina Scribner, MS, RD, focuses on the effects that various nutrients may have on the development and treatment of different mental health disorders. What are the implications for psychiatrists?


  • Significance for the practicing psychiatrist: Clinicians can have a positive impact on the nutrition of patients with eating disorders by integrating elements of diet and nutrition into psychiatric care. For a mobile-friendly view of the Monarch Notes, click here.


  • Eating Disorders and Psychosis
    It could be argued that many patients with eating disorders have delusional ideas (defined as fixed false beliefs unresponsive to confrontation or actual fact). The off-label use of antipsychotics could be a clinician response to the occasional presence of psychotic symptoms among patients with eating disorders.


  • Significance for the practicing psychiatrist: Eating disorders and psychotic disorders are both characterized by distorted thoughts, overvalued ideas, depersonalization and derealization phenomena, and delusions. Antipsychotic medications that induce weight gain may be counterproductive in patients with eating disorders. For a mobile-friendly view of the Monarch Notes, click here.

Comments

This is highly intéresting: particularly the association between psychosis and ÉD which has long seemed probable. A distinguished Greek-Italian psychiatrist (now deceased) suggested in at least one case that the ED could have been an early and/or concurrent manifestation of bipolar disorder... What do others think?

Marta Aleksandra @

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