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Major Depressive Disorder

Late-life depression is defined in this article as unipolar depressive syndromes that older adults experience, typically around age 60 or older with clinically significant depressive symptoms or minor depression. Details here.

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Major Depressive Disorder

Depression is a frequent psychiatric comorbidity among patients with restless leg syndrome. The case presented here illustrates the importance of evaluating for RLS symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder who complain of insomnia.

"Depression is overwhelming and overpowering, and it crushes its prey." Here: a pediatrician tells of her 40-year battle with severe depression, and offers insights about how to talk with someone who is depressed.

A reexamination of flurothyl infusions holds promise for improved resolution of severe mood disorders, as well as for a greater understanding of the mechanism of their pathophysiology.

When most people think of serious illnesses, they generally have in mind those that can destroy the body, such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.

Psychiatrists have found ways to bring their expert skills and knowledge to the care of medically ill patients who are nearing the final phase of life.

Evidence has accumulated on the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation in major depression. The authors review its potential mechanism of action, findings from recent clinical trials, and potential role in the treatment of depressive disorders.

In this CME article, the focus is on persons with a formally recognized recurrent wintertime mood disorder that rises to such a level that it merits a diagnostic title and clinical intervention.

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