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Military Mental Health

Compromised Confidentiality in the Military Is Harmful

A patient seeks mental health treatment. The boss reads his file. This happens in the military.

Military Mental Health

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The patient did not just scream for more medication—he literally rolled on the floor, ranting and raving and demanding higher doses. Some may write him off as an "addict," but this case reaffirms the value of studying medicine before practicing psychiatry or psychopharmacology.

American Sniper

Neither facile liberal censure nor rabid applause from the right speak to Eastwood’s purposes in this superbly crafted picture.

In most movies, psychiatrists are depicted in a negative light, which most certainly affects our public image. Was the psychiatrist in American Sniper portrayed positively or negatively?

Given that rates of military suicide have risen to unprecedented levels, the burden of empirical proof in support of weak military mental health confidentiality standards is squarely on the military.

The privacy and security of our offices—the therapeutic bunkers within which our wounded patient-warriors hunker down against an unseen enemy—is the fundamental first barricade between private sufferings and the potential for public humiliation.

Military veterans are ubiquitous in our practices and in our lives. The impact of the past several years of armed conflict is greater than many think—and much greater than simply the number of veterans in your practice or your community.

There is increasing evidence and support for medications for alcohol use disorders to be used in regular clinical practice, and not to be limited to specialty substance abuse settings. Here, special considerations for pharmacological management.

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