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Mood Disorders

Mood Disorders

The psychiatrist’s role is to act as a consultant to maximize the likelihood of a successful taper and discontinuation and to minimize collateral morbidities or withdrawal complications. This slideshow features common scenarios in which a planned discontinuation of psychotropic medications occurs.

An interesting pharmacological approach in terms of anti-suicidal strategies is the use of lithium for treatment of patients with affective disorders. Details here.

An overview of select topics in clinical psycho-oncology, including assessment and management of delirium and brain lesions, mood and anxiety disorders, medication adverse effects, and existential death anxiety.

This study highlights the need to consider a holistic approach when discussing the problem of disruptive behavior in health care settings.

We have medications that can affect serotonin, norepinephrine, and—to a lesser extent—dopamine. Many other neurotransmitters are involved with mood disorders, but we have no medications yet to target them. Neurostimulation offers a non-systemic somatic approach to depression, often with an improved side effect profile. More in this Q&A.

Persons with epilepsy have a higher prevalence of comorbid conditions—psychiatric disorders in particular—than the general population. Here: a look at the most common comorbidities and a discussion of the clinical implications.

What is the future of psychiatric assessment and treatment of mood disorders? The articles in this Special Report explore some important aspects and issues.

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