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Munchausen Syndrome

Munchausen Syndrome

A panel of experts at the APA Annual Meeting discussed how changes in DSM-5 may affect clinical practice. Highlights here.

The primary difference between malingering and factitious disorder is the question of motivation.

Staying empathic and keeping the conflict within the patient instead of between the patient and health care provider, is a key to successful management.

Should malingering be considered more likely than factitious disorder when a patient exhibits pseudologia fantastica? What condition persists for longer than 3 months, accompanies a disease process, and is associated with a bodily injury that has not resolved over time? These questions and more in this interactive quiz.

Although acute pain typically resolves on its own with little need for intervention, for some persons pain persists past the point where it is considered an adaptive reaction to injury.

The doctor’s role is to go beyond the obvious and to detect subtle determinants. Good diagnosticians have been trained to look beneath the loud symptom and consider underlying factors.

November/December 2009 Special Report: Forensic Psychiatry

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