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Personality Disorders

Personality Disorders

How the Repressed-Recovered Memory–Multiple Personality Disorder iatrogenic epidemic—surely one of the most tragic chapters in the history of psychiatry, psychology, and psychotherapy—ended, and how psychotherapy patients came to be protected by informed consent.

In the 1980s, thousands of patients insisted they were recovering childhood memories of physical and sexual abuse during Satanic cult rituals. Here: a look back at the moral panic.

Patients with borderline personality disorder or narcissistic personality disorder (or both) can feel entitled to special treatment and often seek only approving forms of attention from those who treat them.

Adjustment disorder is one of the few psychiatric diagnoses for which the etiology, symptoms, and course, rather than symptoms alone, are central to making the diagnosis. Both emotional and behavioral disturbances are present and include low mood, tearfulness, anxiety, self-harm, withdrawal, anger, and irritability.

Borderline personality disorder typically coexists with depression, anxiety, and substance abuse. Symptoms of these conditions may lead the clinician to miss the diagnosis of personality disorder entirely. Careful diagnosis of BPD and comorbid disorders is the first step.

Narcissistic Personality Disorder is largely understudied, in spite of clinicians' warnings that this is the most frequent presentation in patients.

Patients with masochistic tendencies present with self-defeating patterns and often reject help.

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