Topics:

PTSD

Why Should Psychiatrists Care About Military and Veteran Mental Health?

The impact of the past 13 years of armed conflict is greater than many think and much greater than simply the number of veterans in our practices.

PTSD

This CME outlines distinguishing features of PTSD, complex trauma, and the dissociative subtype of PTSD (DPTSD), with an explanation of the distinctive neurobiological subtype of DPTSD.

This sunflower at the 9/11 Memorial said that a ray of sunshine remains, and that life blooms anew, in spite of the losses.

Military veterans are ubiquitous in our practices and in our lives. The impact of the past several years of armed conflict is greater than many think—and much greater than simply the number of veterans in your practice or your community.

Maltreatment at an early age casts a very long shadow. Here: a look at the long-term effects of early childhood trauma.

Substantial progress has been made in the development of etiologic models of intimate partner violence and interventions for individuals who assault their intimate partners. These authors provide details.

This book is the first scholarly work that attempts to fill the enormous gap in the conventional armamentarium used to treat PTSD.

The limited effectiveness of current approaches provide compelling arguments for effective conventional and complementary interventions aimed at preventing PTSD and treating chronic PTSD. Specifics here.

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