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Ronald W. Pies, MD

Ronald W. Pies, MD

Dr Pies is Editor in Chief Emeritus of Psychiatric Times, and a Professor in the psychiatry departments of SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, and Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston. Dr Pies is author, most recently, of Psychiatry on the Edge, a collection of essays drawn from Psychiatric Times (Nova Publishing); and a novel, The Director of Minor Tragedies (iUniverse); and The Myeloma Year, a chapbook of poems and essays.

Posts by Author

•	Psychopharmacology: A Concise Overview for Students and Clinicians, 2nd Ed

Ronald Pies, MD reviews the second edition of Ansari and Osser’s overview of psychopharmacology.


If serotonin was once American psychiatry’s “high school crush,” the field now appears wedded to a more mature model of biological and psychosocial understanding.


Critics of psychiatry claim there is an “epidemic” of mental illness in the US—and some argue this is a consequence of psychiatric treatment. But the best epidemiological evidence reveals no such epidemic in this country, rendering the iatrogenic “explanation” null and void.

There is a myth circulating in the blogosphere—usually among the most extreme critics of our profession—that there exists some monolithic entity called “Psychiatry” (with a capital “P”).

For many of us who went into psychiatry, relieving the patient’s suffering is not a business enterprise, but an ethical and spiritual calling.

A recent report that argues against descriptive diagnosis in medicine is historically ill-informed and medically naive, in the opinion of this psychiatrist.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

What do physicians intend by the term “disease”? The recent IOM report on “systemic exertion intolerance disease” (formerly known as chronic fatigue syndrome) casts this question in a new light and has many practical implications for patients, physicians, and third-party payers.

Readers of Albert Rothenberg’s new book will come away greatly enriched by the author’s own lifelong, creative synthesis.

A commentary on civility and ethical standards in the aftermath of terrorist events in France.

“Distress” hardly captures the inner world of those with severe forms of psychotic illnesses. Terms like “agony,” “torment,” and “anguish” would be much closer to the mark, for many patients.


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