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H. Steven Moffic, MD

H. Steven Moffic, MD

Dr Moffic is an editorial board member of and regular contributor to Psychiatric Times. After an award-filled career focusing on the underserved, he retired from clinical work and his Tenured Professorship at the Medical College of Wisconsin on June 30, 2012. He continues to write, present, and serve on boards devoted to this—and related—ethical concerns. Dr Moffic’s book, The Ethical Way: Challenges and Solutions for Managed Behavioral Healthcare (Jossey-Bass, 1997), was the first on the subject. He has edited ethics columns for 3 psychiatric newsletters.

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“I may never know who you are,” writes this psychiatrist, “but if you provided medical or psychiatric care for the co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525, we are colleagues. And you too are his victims, of sorts. I hope your reputation does not suffer unduly.”

Should racism be considered a psychiatric disorder?

A blog on the cultural components of minority groups, mental illness, and stigma.

In most movies, psychiatrists are depicted in a negative light, which most certainly affects our public image. Was the psychiatrist in American Sniper portrayed positively or negatively?

gender identity

A commentary that is both professional and personal in nature, written by a psychiatrist who has helped hundreds of transitioning patients adapt to their external gender appearance and societal expectations.

The glass of well-being among physicians may be half empty, but there is room and hope to fill it again. Perhaps psychiatrists are the missing ingredient?

Dr Moffic takes us around the world to celebrate the lives of psychiatrists who made important contributions to the field.

Many classics, such as those written by Dickens, can be viewed as a metaphor for psychotherapy. Beyond symptom improvement, psychotherapy addresses the meaning of one's life and how it relates to meaningful values of loved ones as well as the surrounding community.

The greatest tribute to those who perished in France may be to find better ways to put out the fires of terrorism. Mental health professionals are trained to use words to diffuse conflict. The pen is mightier than the sword, but it can also tempt the reckless to load their weapons.

The Psychiatric Views on the News series for Psychiatric Times attempted to bring together societal events and psychiatry to start a conversation. Is a psychiatric view on the news important? If so, what other stories have caught your attention, and why?

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