ubmslatePT-logo-ubm

PT Mobile Logo

Search form

Topics:

Curcumin: New Use for an Old Spice?

Curcumin: New Use for an Old Spice?

  • Although recent reviews caution against overenthusiasm, what if a simple, inexpensive, and extremely low-risk anti-inflammatory was at hand? Scroll through the slides for the latest research. View the information in PDF format.

  • Inflammation as a critical mediator in the pathophysiology of mood disorders.
  • What is known about curcumin for use in psychiatric disorders, particularly bipolar depression?
  • Curcumin is a compound found within the spice turmeric, which is made by grinding the root of the turmeric plant. Western clinical research has largely but not entirely supported the value of curcumin for inflammatory conditions, particularly arthritis.
  • Mechanisms of action of curcumin do fall in line with research on the pathways of mood disorders. It decreases levels of inflammation and has other noteworthy clinical effects.
  • To support using it for our patients, we’d want to see randomized trial data, which have accumulated in recent years.
  • In a study by Lopresti and colleagues [see reference 8], both a low-dose and a high-dose preparation of curcumin extracts showed efficacy in patients with depression.
  • What about bipolar depression?
  • Turmeric extracts are not entirely without risk.
  • Used alone, very little curcumin is systemically absorbed.
  • Turmeric extracts should be monitored and patients’ medical conditions taken into account.
View the information in PDF format.
Disclosures: 

1. Rosenblat JD, Cha DS, Mansur RB, McIntyre RS. Inflamed moods: a review of the interactions between inflammation and mood disorders. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2014;53:23-34.
2. Walker AJ, Kim Y, Price JB, et al. Stress, inflammation, and cellular vulnerability during early stages of affective disorders: biomarker strategies and opportunities for prevention and intervention. Front Psychiatry. 2014;5:34.
3. Phelps J. Inflammation: curb your enthusiasm. Psychiatric Times. September 3, 2015. Accessed October 22, 2016.
4. University of Maryland Medical Center. Turmeric. http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/turmeric. Accessed October 22, 2016.
5. Daily JW, Yang M, Park S. Efficacy of turmeric extracts and curcumin for alleviating the symptoms of joint arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. J Med Food. 2016;19:717-729.
6. Yu JJ, Pei LB, Zhang Y, et al. Chronic supplementation of curcumin enhances the efficacy of antidepressants in major depressive disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015;35:406-410.
7. Andrade C. A critical examination of studies on curcumin for depression. J Clin Psychiatry. 2014;75:e1110-e1112.
8. Lopresti AL, Drummond PD. Efficacy of curcumin, and a saffron/curcumin combination for the treatment of major depression: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. J Affect Disord. 2016;207:188-196.
9. Phelps J, Angst J, Katzow J, Sadler J. Validity and utility of bipolar spectrum models. Bipolar Disord. 2008;10(1 Pt 2):179-193.
10. Shoba G, Joy D, Joseph T, et al. Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers. Planta Med. 1998;64:353-356.

Comments

Cathy Nakajima -- This is a nicely put-together presentation. I have to chuckle a bit. I've lived together many years with my husband who is Japanese, and in the winter there are certain dishes that are served more often than other parts of the year, as part of his cultural tradition. I don't know that this is widespread in the country of his birth, or merely a family custom. But, in the winter, we often eat hot pot, or meals served from one hot heated dish which amounts to a savory conglomeration of flavors, not much in the way of a range of seasonings but a variety of vegetables. In winter we can look forward to different seasonal foods such as sukiyaki with lots of mushrooms, gobo, bamboo shoots, and napa (Chinese cabbage), or oden (with turnips and delectable variety of preserved fish), or curry (carrots, potatoes, apples, and green peppers). Folks closer to the equator might be astounded by the Japanese version of curry, but it does come in different degrees of heat! Anyway, I'm looking forward to that item on the menu next week.

Catharine @

Adding some to yellow the color of rice is helpful. I am Asian, my mum used to give me warm water and turmeric (tasted disgusting) for stomach upset. Curry and rice is better.My mum said that "it is very useful for lots of other things" but did not specify what.
Good to see well referenced and interesting "off beat" (?) stuff; thanks Dr Phelps. bear in mind that stuff like that Eastern junk, meditation, can't help with depression can it?
Don't forget chili (and the effects of black pepper), but moderation is is called for. Demonstrating a a dose response relationship would be interesting.
Dr Nadim Siddiqui

Nadim @

Adding some to yellow the color of rice is helpful. I am Asian, my mum used to give me warm water and turmeric (tasted disgusting) for stomach upset. Curry and rice is better.My mum said that "it is very useful for lots of other things" but did not specify what.
Good to see well referenced and interesting "off beat" (?) stuff; thanks Dr Phelps. bear in mind that stuff like that Eastern junk, meditation, can't help with depression can it?
Don't forget chili (and the effects of black pepper), but moderation is is called for. Demonstrating a a dose response relationship would be interesting.
Dr Nadim Siddiqui

Nadim @

How much curcamin is used daily for depression?
Yankı Büke Ötles.MD.

Yankı @

Very nice presentation. As an Asian Turmeric is an important ingredient in our food and considered a good anti-inflammatory. All of the information about the use of turmeric is helpful in mental illness.

Thanks again for a nice presentation.

Nusrat @

what is the impact of dietary ingestion of turmeric?

Ilene @

A good sidedish for many willing to try it.

Jose Miguel @

Thank you for this presentation. I work within the South Asian community and they use fresh tumeric for medicinal purpose especially for acne, and to heal wounds.

Hope this is helpful

Satwant @

After some comments under my full name, elsewhere, I felt harassed in a grade above standard endurable 'suspiciousness-paranoia', this is one of the reasons why I entered only a name, not a surname, in the identity for comments here, the system allowed it, my full identity information appears in the UBM: 'My Account' section, please feel free to read and check the info there; as of today, I don't remember the way to change the identity appearing in comments to a full one, that anyway, will provide little of interest to readers, I'm retired, with no clinical or teaching or research activity at all. Thanks for your interest and patience, best regards, + Salut

Dear "Jose," If commenters do not follow the policy, they run the risk of having their comments deleted. Readers are not able to identify your account to identify who you are. In the future, simply follow comments with the full name. Thank you. -The Editors

Jose @

In India, this is a spice that is part of most food that is eaten daily, and is mixed in with other spices, which, as this article suggests, may help its absorption.

Mukesh @

What are the stats on the prevalence of bipolar depression in India, I wonder?

Victoria @

I'd point a doubt on Curcumin, that it has GallBladder muscle promoting activity noticeable at doses around 200 mg, but anti-cancer doses were in the range of grams a day.
Another product with immunemodulating, and activating properties, as some patients had to switch intake from hs to am, to avoid insomnia, is Anapsos, a Calaguala fern extract, from root or aerial parts, once approved for Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis

JOSE: As per our policy, please include your full name and credentials with your comment. Thanks.
-The Editors

Jose @

Add new comment

 
Loading comments...

By clicking Accept, you agree to become a member of the UBM Medica Community.