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Substance Use Disorder

Meth Emergency

A woman presents to the emergency department after 6 months of near-daily methamphetamine use.

Related content:
Benzodiazepines and Chronic Pain

Substance Use Disorder

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There are probably few health care professionals who are unaware of the concerns about the apparent overprescription of opioids. However, we have had only limited information on how good a job physicians may actually be doing in prescribing these medications.

Top Research That May Change How You Treat Patients With Substance Use Disorders

The authors use a 3-step process to identify and evaluate published research with findings that are ready for—and that have a direct bearing on—clinical practice.

There is increasing evidence that individuals who try marijuana during their early teenage years are affected neurologically for a decade or more at least until one's 20s and perhaps even longer. More in this video.

In clinical terms, one of the most distinguishing diagnostic features of addictive disorders is that those affected continually and repeatedly revert to their addictive behaviors, despite the devastating negative and adverse consequences.

Could repeated episodes of vomiting in this young woman be related to ingestion of a drug?

For the past year, the patient has had episodes of severe nausea, vomiting, headache, and abdominal pain separated by weeks of feeling quite well.

Best practices make a strong case against prescribing benzodiazepines for chronic pain patients taking opioids. But are we following best practices?

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