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Psychiatric Times

Solitary Confinement: It Defines Who We Are

In the opinion of this psychiatrist, solitary confinement of mentally ill prisoners is cruel and unusual punishment.

Recent Content

Vascular surgeons, internists, and neurologists all exist—but why aren’t there any vascular psychiatrists? There certainly is a need.

Detainees in state and federal prisons have committed crimes that many of us can never forgive. But how we treat such people beyond the loss of freedom and certain rights is entirely about who we are as a society. More in this commentary.

Psychiatry must remain a profession defined by an organizing model of the mind, rather than by specific treatment techniques. Psychodynamic psychiatry offers such a model, and it is applicable to all psychiatric patients.

When I learned my first scale at 45 I knew I would never rip loose and free like the pros who started as teenagers, when time didn’t matter and practicing was just another form of play.

Regulatory bodies that oversee hospitals and graduate medical education have begun to place an ever growing importance on patient safety and quality improvement, from which psychiatry is not immune. More in this case study.

A variety of commonly used psychiatric medications--including phenothiazines, antipsychotics, serotonergic agonists, β-blockers SSRIs, clonidine, carbamazepine, and valproic acid—increase the risk of heatstroke. Psychiatric patients in jails and prisons face a difficult challenge in that they may not have the freedom to change their environment to avoid heatstroke.

A guide for helping patients understand heroin, its history, and how it impacts our communities.

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