Psychiatric Times Vol 19 No 8

GREAT EXPECTATIONS A Warm Welcome to 21st Century Psychiatry

August 01, 2002

In the last third of the 20th century, psychiatry boldly shook off a 120-year-long philosophical funk and rushed to catch up in the thrilling march of medicine. The biopsychosocial model that once sounded trendy now seems to be an indispensable approach. The pioneers of psychopharmacology who once labored at the margins have now been joined by thousands of bright young doctors who treat patients with depression, psychosis and impulsive aggression and realize that a troubled soul is often expressing the cries of a troubled brain. This issue of Psychiatric Times celebrates the stirring giant that is 21st-century neuropsychiatry--a discipline that derives its immense power and scope from the glad embrace of the twin Enlightenment ideals of humanism and the scientific method.

Report Highlights Need for Police Sensitivity to Mental Health

August 01, 2002

The Council of State Governments argues that police should be better trained to deal with mentally ill offenders. Increased funding is being requested in Congress to support educational programs for law enforcement.

ADHD--Overcoming the Specter of Overdiagnosis

August 01, 2002

Although ADHD can be effectively treated and can lead to significant dysfunction if left untreated, negative public perceptions still abound. Proper diagnosis, exploration of comorbid disorders and collaboration with other health care professionals may be the answer to ensuring positive outcomes for children afflicted with this disorder.

Are Migraines and Bipolar Disorder Related?

August 01, 2002

Migraine is characterized by episodes of headache with qualities such as unilateral location, throbbing pain and aggravation by routine physical activity. Additional symptoms include nausea, photophobia and phonophobia. Some patients have aura symptoms, usually visual, before the headache phase (Davidoff, 1995). Prodromal and accompanying symptoms of migraine attacks often are psychiatric in nature, such as depression, elation, irritability, anxiety, overactivity, difficulty thinking, anorexia or increased appetite. In some patients, an organic mental syndrome can be part of a migraine attack (Davidoff, 1995). In other patients, an acute psychotic condition is the dominating clinical feature. This presentation, with paranoid delusions, hallucinations and anxiety, has been described in families with hemiplegic migraine (Spranger et al., 1999). Migraine is, therefore, an important differential diagnosis in relation to episodic phenomena with a mixture of somatic and psychiatric symptoms. In addition, psychosocial stress is the most common precipitating factor for a migraine attack (Davidoff, 1995).

Identifying and Treating Suicidal College Students

August 01, 2002

After numerous hospitalizations, electroconvulsive therapy and a battery of drug trials, a college senior remained suicidal. Looking for advice on her patient, a psychiatrist brought the case to a team meeting, only to be told by a senior colleague, "You can't save them all."

Are Migraines and Bipolar Disorder Related?

August 01, 2002

Migraine is characterized by episodes of headache with qualities such as unilateral location, throbbing pain and aggravation by routine physical activity. Additional symptoms include nausea, photophobia and phonophobia. Some patients have aura symptoms, usually visual, before the headache phase (Davidoff, 1995). Prodromal and accompanying symptoms of migraine attacks often are psychiatric in nature, such as depression, elation, irritability, anxiety, overactivity, difficulty thinking, anorexia or increased appetite.