Psychiatric Times Vol 14 No 12

The Changing Future of Drug Formularies

December 01, 1997

Peter Penna, Pharm. D. spoke on the future of drug formularies and how he sees them changing. Formularies in managed care evolved out of formularies in hospitals and have been around since drugs became relatively commonly used in patient settings, Penna explained. "Today, formularies are widely used by hospitals, managed care organizations, pharmacy benefit management companies, home health agencies and nursing home services."

Media Advocacy Promotes Freedom to Speak Out

December 01, 1997

Nelson Kull, executive director of Pathways, sees an additional benefit to consumer employment: it provides patients with a first-hand look inside the system, and this can help defuse the sometimes antagonistic relationship between consumers and caregivers. "Some people criticize doctors and pharmaceutical companies for making a lot of money," says Kull, "but they gave me back my life. I once told meeting [attendees] that yes, psychiatry and medical care cost a lot, but your car costs a lot. I can't drive my car without my medications, so which comes first?"

Criminal Charges Filed in Recovered Memory Case

December 01, 1997

The stakes in the debate over recovered memories therapy ratcheted upward in October with the indictment of five health care professionals, including two psychiatrists, in Houston. Charged in a 60-count indictment-believed to be the first of its kind in the United States-the former staff members of the now defunct dissociative disorders unit at the Spring Shadows Glen Psychiatric Hospital are accused of perpetrating a "scheme to defraud by allegedly falsely diagnosing patients with multiple personality disorder caused by their alleged participation in a secret satanic cult."

Managed Care: Nowhere to Run

December 01, 1997

As a consultant and educator for various stakeholders in the delivery of managed mental health services, I see confusion, skepticism and demoralization in the mental health professions about the direction health care is taking. Many doubt their ability to achieve the objective of the managed care mantra: Better care at less cost. To the clinician delivering care, it feels as if there is no stable ground to stand on, or, in the words of a 1960s female R & B group: "Nowhere to run to baby, nowhere to hide." Our profession seems to be either frozen in fear or disorganized in struggle, not grounded and coordinated in response to the changes that are upon us.

Research Links OCD and Streptococcal Infections

December 01, 1997

There is an increasing body of data that suggests there may be relationship between certain forms of childhood-onset OCD and previous Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. They seem to have early-onset OCD, tic disorder, Sydenham's chorea and family history of tics. Sydenham's chorea, a major manifestation of rheumatic fever and a disorder generally limited to prepubertal children, is thought to be disease of basal ganglia, and the basal ganglia is thought to be involved in both Sydenham's chorea and OCD. Children with Sydenham's chorea frequently present with OCD symptoms.