Psychiatric Times Vol 21 No 2

Commentary: The Case Against Physician-Assisted Suicide: For the Right to End-of-Life Care

February 01, 2004

Euthanasia is a word coined from Greek in the 17th century to refer to an easy, painless, happy death. In modern times, however, it has come to mean a physician's causing a patient's death by injection of a lethal dose of medication. In physician-assisted suicide, the physician prescribes the lethal dose, knowing the patient intends to end their life.

The History of ECT: Unsolved Mysteries

February 01, 2004

In looking at the history of ECT, it appeared to have been quite successful in treating a variety of psychiatric disorders. If that is the case, then why did it disappear from the "psychiatric map" for a number of years? What obstacles need to be overcome to return ECT to its place as a viable treatment option?

Treating Insomnia in Patients With Substance Use/Abuse Disorders

February 01, 2004

Patients who use or abuse alcohol and other substance are at high risk for insomnia and present unique challenges for treating this debilitating disease. The three avenues of treatment--behavioral, OTC medications and prescription medications--are reviewed and future trends are outlined.

Preventive Interventions for Children of Divorce

February 01, 2004

Studies have shown that children of divorced parents may suffer more mental health problems, particularly conduct disorders. What programs might be effective in helping these children deal with the stress of their parents' divorce? Are there effective programs to teach parents better coping skills?

Social Developmental Overview of Heavy Episodic or Binge Drinking Among U.S. College Students

February 01, 2004

Reported by two out of every five college students nationally, heavy episodic or binge drinking may be the most frequently reported and researched mental health problem among college youth. Effective prevention and treatment should reflect the heterogeneity of binge drinking, as it can cause substantial and serious harms.

Treating Insomnia in Patients With Substance Use/Abuse Disorders

February 01, 2004

espite the fact that about 30% of our life is spent sleeping and decades of research have been spent on sleep, we still do not know its real function. What we do know is lack of sleep can have serious implications, such as increased risk of depressive disorders, impaired breathing and heart disease. On the other hand, nighttime sleep disturbance is usually followed by excessive daytime sleepiness that is associated with delayed problems like memory deficits and impaired social and occupational function, and immediate consequences such as car accidents (Kupfer and Reynolds, 1997; Roehrs and Roth, 1995).

Treating Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorders and Hepatitis C

February 01, 2004

Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is frequently complicated by the presence of co-existing substance use disorders and mental illnesses. It is important to find improved ways to address barriers to care, and to provide effective and humane care to patients suffering from HCV infection.