Author | Maher Karam-hage, MD

Articles

Treating Insomnia in Patients With Substance Use/Abuse Disorders

February 01, 2004

Patients who use or abuse alcohol and other substance are at high risk for insomnia and present unique challenges for treating this debilitating disease. The three avenues of treatment--behavioral, OTC medications and prescription medications--are reviewed and future trends are outlined.

Treating Insomnia in Patients With Substance Use/Abuse Disorders

February 01, 2004

espite the fact that about 30% of our life is spent sleeping and decades of research have been spent on sleep, we still do not know its real function. What we do know is lack of sleep can have serious implications, such as increased risk of depressive disorders, impaired breathing and heart disease. On the other hand, nighttime sleep disturbance is usually followed by excessive daytime sleepiness that is associated with delayed problems like memory deficits and impaired social and occupational function, and immediate consequences such as car accidents (Kupfer and Reynolds, 1997; Roehrs and Roth, 1995).