Celiac Disease Implicated in Cognitive Deficits

Mar 02, 2020

Depression, suicidal ideation, self-harming behaviors, and anxiety, as well as lower reaction time and cognitive decline, were found in patients with celiac disease, according to a recent study

NEWS BRIEF

Depression, suicidal ideation, self-harming behaviors, and anxiety, as well as lower reaction time and cognitive decline, were found in patients with celiac disease (CD), according to a recent study.1

Croall and colleagues of the University of Sheffield looked at medical data from the National UK Biobank to evaluate prevalance of cognitive dysfunction in those with CD, an autoimmune disease known to spark severe reactions after injesting gluten. Of 104 participants with CD, there were significant deficits in reaction time and worsening mental states.

Research Fellow, Dr Ian Croall, from the University of Sheffield, Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease, said in a press release, "For the first time, the study offers some clarity on the fact that there does appear to be the risk of neurological damage for people living with CD, driven by their autoimmune response to gluten exposure."2

References:

1. Croall ID, Sanders DS, Hadjivassiliou M, Hoggard N. Cognitive Deficit and White Matter Changes in Persons with Celiac Disease: a Population-Based Study. Gastroenterology. 2020 Feb 20. [Epub ahead of print].

2. Sheffield researchers confirm coeliac disease can damage the brain. The University of Sheffield. February 27, 2020. https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news/nr/sheffield-coeliac-disease-brain-damage-1.882611. Accessed March 2, 2020.

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