Classification of Psychodermatological Disorders

January 22, 2015
Mohammad Jafferany, MD

There is no universally accepted classification of psychodermatological disease, but this slideshow serves as a general overview of these disorders.

Diagnosing an underlying psychiatric component in a patient who has skin disease involves several dimensions. Evaluation is challenging but it plays a major role in creating an effective treatment plan. There is no universally accepted classification of psychodermatological disease, but this slideshow serves as a general overview of these disorders.CLASSIFICATION OF PSYCHODERMATOLOGICAL DISORDERSPsychophysiological disordersAcneAphthosisAtopic dermatitisHerpes simplexHyperhidrosisPruritusPsoriasisRosaceaSeborrheic dermatitisUrticariaPsychiatric disorders with dermatological symptomsBody dysmorphic disorderDelusion of parasitosisDermatitis artefactaEating disordersNeurotic excoriationsObsessive-compulsive disorderPhobic statesPsychogenic purpuraTrichotillomaniaDermatological disorders with psychiatric symptomsAcne excorieeAlbinismAlopecia areataChronic eczemaGeneralized psoriasisIchithyosiform syndromesNeurofibromaRhinophymaVitiligoMiscellaneousCutaneous sensory syndrome: glossodynia, vulvodynia, chronic itchingPseudopsychodermatological diseasePsychogenic purpura syndrome Source: Adapted from a Psychiatric Times article by Mohammad Jafferany, MD, titled "Psychodermatology: When the Mind and Skin Interact." This article, originally posted as a Tipsheet on February 22, 2012, has since been updated.