Psychiatric Times Vol 25 No 13

Two Stories We Tell Ourselves About Cancer

November 02, 2008

Like more and more cancer patients today, I have outlived several prognoses and am still hanging around, in a diminished life, trying to outlive the latest. Sooner or later, all of us get swept up into one or another of the collectively available cancer story lines in the culture.

Dignity in the Gray Zone Indiana v Edwards

November 02, 2008

The jaw-dropping indignity was easy to miss at a time when the O.J. Simpson murder trial was unfolding. A man named Colin Ferguson had been charged with killing 6 people and wounding another 19 after an apparently indiscriminant shooting spree aboard a Long Island railroad train.

An Epidemic of Depression

November 02, 2008

Major depressive disorder has become psychiatry’s signature diagnosis. Depression is diagnosed in about 40% of patients who see a psychiatrist. This percentage is double that of just 20 years ago.

Depression Treatment Turns a Neuromodulatory Corner: FDA Clears TMS Device

November 02, 2008

The FDA has cleared the first transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device (Neuro-Star) for the treatment of major depressive disorder in adults who show no improvement after an adequate trial of a single antidepressant.

American Psychological Association Vote Approves Resolution on Detainee Interrogations

November 02, 2008

After months of controversy and pressure from colleagues and the media, the American Psychological Association (APA) has voted on a resolution stating that psychologists may not work in settings with or take part in consultation of detainee interrogations operated overseas by the CIA, including Guantanamo Bay.

Vets Suicide Hotline on the Hot Seat

November 01, 2008

A Blue Ribbon report and a hearing in a House subcommittee raised fresh questions about the sufficiency of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) response to suicides among veterans-especially those returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

New Link Found Between Brain Protein and Alzheimer Disease

November 01, 2008

A discovery about the brain protein KIBRA, commonly found in the kidneys and brain, could lead to future treatments for Alzheimer disease (AD). Investigators at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), lead by Corneveaux and Liang, in Phoenix found that the risk for AD is 25% lower in persons who carry the memory-enhancing KIBRA gene.1 This fi nding indicates that there might be a link between KIBRA and some of the proteins with which it interacts.

Nations Convene to Create Bipolar Consensus Statement

November 01, 2008

Participants from around the globe recently came together to create an international consensus statement on bipolar disorder that was presented at the 21st Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP).

Compulsive

November 01, 2008

Another day without timeto write: patients call in crisis,apple trees need stakes,cord wood waits to be stacked,and rows of pink-topped turnipsremain buried in half-frozen earth.

The Decline of Psychotherapy

November 01, 2008

Although several studies indicate that psychotherapy (alone or in combination with medications) can help psychiatric patients reach recovery faster and stay well longer, a declining number of office-based psychiatrists are providing psychotherapy to their patients.

Phase 1 Clinical Trial to Test Gene Therapy for Chronic Pain

November 01, 2008

Scientists from the University of Michigan are beginning a phase 1 clinical trial for the treatment of cancerrelated pain that uses a novel gene transfer vector-an agent used to carry genes into cells-injected into the skin to deliver a pain-relieving gene to the nervous system.

Setting the Record Straight

November 01, 2008

Perhaps you read the editorial commentary in the August issue of Psychiatric Times in which our editor-in-chief, Ronald Pies, MD, wrote about ongoing congressional hearings into potential conflicts of interest (COIs) among prominent psychiatrists?

Traumatic Brain Injury and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

November 01, 2008

Our returning military veterans remind us dramatically of the importance to consider traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a potential comorbid illness in cases of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The common causes of comorbid TBI and PTSD are assault and battery to the head, head trauma (personal or work-related injuries), civilian or military explosions, inflicted head trauma in children, motor vehicle accidents, and suicide attempts by jumping. Prevalence figures for comorbid TBI and PTSD historically have been lacking

Painting Neural Circuitry With a Viral Brush: Are the Neighbors Green?

November 01, 2008

In last month’s column (“Painting Neural Circuitry With a Viral Brush,” Psychiatric Times, October 2008, page 16), I used Michelangelo’s famous fresco, “Hand of God Giving Life to Adam” on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel as a metaphor to introduce a series of technologies that have allowed researchers to map the complex interactions of neural connections in continuously functioning neural tissues.

Sleep Disturbances Associated With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

November 01, 2008

The National Comorbidity Survey estimates that approximately 50% of the population in the United States is exposed to traumatic events and that the lifetime prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is approximately 7.8%.

Psychiatric Medications for Children

November 01, 2008

Too often news headlines exert a major influence on our patients-and nothing in child psychiatry grabs headlines like the alleged overprescription of medicines. Physicians sidestep the debate, assuring their patients and themselves that each prescription is written only after careful consideration of risks and bene-fits.