Author | James M. Ellison, MD, MPH

Articles

Recognizing and Treating Geriatric Mood Disorders

May 14, 2015

In order for older patients to derive greater enjoyment from their later years, clinicians must take special care during evaluation, treatment, and follow up when working with this growing population.

Update on Mood Disorders in Later Life

June 17, 2014

Mood disorders in older adults are neither inevitable nor particularly resistant to treatment. With attention to the special needs of older patients during evaluation, treatment, and follow up, clinicians can help many patients derive greater enjoyment from their later years.

A Dark Side of Dementia Care

April 15, 2014

Placing black floor mats in front of exits to deter demented nursing home residents from dangerous wandering may pose ethical questions.

Introduction: Dementia, Delirium, Depression, Drugs, and Driving

July 27, 2012

Of the 3 informative articles included in this special geriatric collection, 1 offers a perspective on the treatment of depression that does not focus on somatotherapy. The others remind us of 2 additional geriatric Ds of importance: drugs and driving.

Bone Mass Density Loss and Antidepressants: Another Tough Break for SSRI Users?

October 01, 2008

When I was recently asked by a patient about the link between osteoporosis and SSRIs, I dimly recalled this topic’s emergence in a medical journal in 2007, its subsequent meander through several newsletters, and its gradual return to the bottom of my mental risk-assessment checklist.

Pharmacotherapy for Mild Cognitive Impairment: Are We There Yet?

May 01, 2008

One recent survey found that more than 1 in 4 patients who have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were receiving cholinesterase inhibitors in Italian AD treatment centers even though these medications were being used "off-label."

Agitation in Dementia: Update and Prospectus

February 01, 2008

On a hypothetical morning, you've arrived early at your office to answer e-mails and respond to prescription requests without interruptions. The following voice mail, left for you much earlier that day, awaits your attention: "Doctor, I need to discuss my mother's behavior with you. The medications she's taking might be calming her down during the days, but she's not okay at night."