Linda H. Chaudron, MD, MS

LYMAN PHARMACY

20006 HIGHWAY 53

Articles

Critical Issues in Perinatal Psychiatric Emergency Care

May 01, 2006

The perinatal period is a high-risk time for some women to experience a new onset or exacerbation of a mood disorder that may require emergency psychiatric care.

Critical Issues in Perinatal Psychiatric Emergency Care

November 01, 2005

Over the past decade, there has been increasing attention to the identification and management of mood and anxiety disorders related to childbearing. Emergen- cy physicians, including psychiatrists, primary care providers, obstetricians, gynecologists, and pediatricians, encounter women who are struggling with mental health issues in the context of reproductive events, such as pregnancy, pregnancy loss, and the postpartum adjustment period. In some cases, the reproductive event may precipitate a mental health crisis. In others, it may exacerbate an underlying mental health condition that, in turn, may need to be managed differently because of issues related to pregnancy or breast-feeding.

Differential Diagnosis of Postpartum Psychosis

November 01, 2005

New mothers may present to the emergency department (ED) with symptoms ranging from mild anxiety to severe psychosis. Postpartum psychosis has abrupt onset and severe symptoms and usually occurs in the immediate postpartum period. Patients who have had a previous episode of postpartum psychosis or have first-degree relatives with postpartum psychosis or bipolar disorder are at higher risk.

Postpartum Anxiety or Depression? Diagnosis and Treatment in Nursing Mothers

November 01, 2005

Women with postpartum depression frequently experience intrusive, obsessive ruminations that are part of a depressive episode. Many women with postpartum depression have significant anxiety, and many reach the level of meeting criteria for full-blown anxiety disorders. An anxiety disorder may also precede and contribute to the development of a depressive episode.