Author | Paul S. Appelbaum, MD

Articles

Forensic Ethics, Interrogations, and Getting the Facts Right

December 01, 2010

Article

DEBATE When you get facts wrong, as Dr Halpern does, it is hard to end up with the right conclusions. He suggests incorrectly that my approach to forensic ethics leads to the conclusion that participation in interrogation is permissible, when exactly the opposite is true.

Managed Care and the Next Generation of Mental Health Law: An Update

December 01, 1998

Article

To understand how mental health law is changing, one must begin with a sense of its traditional orientation. The underlying principle of the law that governs psychiatric practice has been that patients require protection from unjustified restrictions on their liberty, especially at the hands of the state.

Is It Ethical for Psychiatrists to Participate in Competency-To-Be-Executed Evaluations?

January 01, 1998

Article

Death Sentence, Ethics, Psychiatry, Competency, Execution, Prisoner, Psychiatrists

Is It Ethical for Psychiatrists to Participate in Competency-To-Be-Executed Evaluations?

January 01, 1998

Article

In its 1986 decision in Ford v. Wainwright, the U.S. Supreme Court found that death row prisoners had a constitutional right not to be executed if they were incompetent (477 U.S. 399 [1986]). Competence for execution-an odd concept, but one whose roots go back to biblical times-usually requires that a prisoner understand the nature of the punishment about to be imposed and why it is being imposed.

Is It Ethical for Psychiatrists to Participate in Competency-To-Be-Executed Evaluations?

January 01, 1998

Article

In its 1986 decision in Ford v. Wainwright, the U.S. Supreme Court found that death row prisoners had a constitutional right not to be executed if they were incompetent (477 U.S. 399 [1986]). Competence for execution-an odd concept, but one whose roots go back to biblical times-usually requires that a prisoner understand the nature of the punishment about to be imposed and why it is being imposed.

Is It Ethical for Psychiatrists to Participate in Competency-To-Be-Executed Evaluations?

January 01, 1998

Article

In its 1986 decision in Ford v. Wainwright, the U.S. Supreme Court found that death row prisoners had a constitutional right not to be executed if they were incompetent (477 U.S. 399 [1986]). Competence for execution-an odd concept, but one whose roots go back to biblical times-usually requires that a prisoner understand the nature of the punishment about to be imposed and why it is being imposed.

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