Author | James L. Knoll IV, MD

Articles

Panic and Pandemics: The Return of the Absurd

March 30, 2020

Article

We often push thoughts of death far out of our awareness, but at the present time they unavoidably re-emerge. Can we learn something helpful from this?

Psychiatric Malpractice Grand Rounds: Addiction Psychiatry

February 25, 2020

Article

James L. Knoll IV, MD, analyzes the ethical and legal duties of psychiatrists treating substance use disorders.

Cruel, Immoral Behavior Is Not Mental Illness

February 24, 2020

Article

How can a human being commit such acts without being under the influence of some powerful “alien” force? How can they not be "mentally ill"? Here's how.

Zen and the Art of Documentation

November 07, 2019

Slideshow

Lawyers tend to be good at spotting unexplained inconsistencies in documentation. Take these steps to protect yourself.

Guidance Along the Path: 20 Meditations for Psychiatry Residents

October 15, 2019

Slideshow

In the spirit of honoring and guiding trainees, the authors provide advice to today’s psychiatric residents-the psychiatric leaders of tomorrow.

Psychiatric Malpractice Grand Rounds: The Tarasoff Dilemma

September 27, 2019

Article

An expert provides sage advice to avoid a malpractice lawsuit, even in the face of potentially tragic outcomes.

What Can Cain and Abel Teach Us About Mass Shootings?

September 24, 2019

Article

A close analysis of the psychodynamics of Cain’s crime shows us something important about his mentality-not to be confused with mental illness.

Duty of Care and Informed Consent

March 15, 2019

Article

Medical malpractice, a form of professional negligence, remains a heavily criticized legal solution for ensuring patient autonomy and competent health care.

Moving Beyond “Motives” in Mass Shootings

January 14, 2019

Article

Focusing on concerning behaviors may better assist with prevention than sensationalizing individual perpetrators’ motives.

Psychiatry, “Dangerousness,” and the President

February 16, 2018

Article

Labeling a (clinically unexamined) public figure as "dangerous" can do as much or more harm as promulgating a specific psychiatric diagnosis.