Addressing Challenges and Opportunities for Better Outcomes

March 1, 2003
Peter F. Buckley, MD

Volume 20, Issue 3

The field of schizophrenia recently has seen remarkable progress in the understanding and treatment of this disabling condition. Dr. Buckley provides highlights of this special report.

The field of schizophrenia research recently has seen remarkable progress in the understanding and treatment of this disabling condition, and this special report reflects such progress. Leading academic clinicians provide comprehensive overviews of the present state of knowledge on key aspects of the detection, course and treatment of schizophrenia.

Addressing the course of schizophrenia in late life, Dilip V. Jeste, M.D., and Elizabeth W. Twamley, Ph.D., carefully document the salient characteristics of late-onset schizophrenia. They thoughtfully assert that these observations may reflect differences in the neurobiology of schizophrenia when it emerges later in life. They also provide practical guidance on the treatment of psychosis in late life.

Perhaps the most pronounced advancement in schizophrenia research is the prodigious developments in the treatment of people with schizophrenia. In a very short period of time, the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia has expanded in options, diversified in approaches and ultimately provided heightened optimism for superior clinical outcomes for patients suffering with this illness. However, while the advances in the pharmacotherapy can allow for more effective treatment without motor side effects, these new drugs also have their own adverse-effect profiles. Hua Jin, M.D., and Jonathan M. Meyer, M.D., carefully review the emerging issue of diabetes mellitus with atypical antipsychotic use. They highlight that glucose dysregulation poses significant challenges--and opportunities--for the comprehensive care of people with schizophrenia.

This special report synthesizes a wide array of new information. The efforts of the contributors to provide a scholarly account of the current "state-of-play" of these important aspects of the course and treatment of schizophrenia are much appreciated.

It is with great appreciation that Psychiatric Times recognizes Dr. Buckley for his assistance in planning and reviewing this special report section. Dr. Buckley is professor and chair of the department of psychiatry and health behavior at the Medical College of Georgia. Within the field of schizophrenia, his research has focused on antipsychotic medications and brain imaging studies. He has also written and edited numerous books and articles on the topic.