clinical scales

Jan 29, 2010

Making the correct diagnosis in pediatric attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is especially important today. The Vanderbilt Rating Scales follow closely the criteria set forth in DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – IV) and have been customized to observations made in the home and classroom environments.

 

 

 

VADPRS (Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Parent Rating Scale) and VADTRS (Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Teacher Rating Scale)

 

Making the correct diagnosis in pediatric attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is especially important today. The Vanderbilt Rating Scales follow closely the criteria set forth in DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – IV) and have been customized to observations made in the home and classroom environments.

 

ASRS (Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale)


ADHD can persist into adulthood and have a significant impact on a person's relationships, careers, and even safety. The ASRS (Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale) is a checklist of 18 questions about symptoms that are based on the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV. The patient answers the questions and a positive score suggests the need for a thorough clinical evaluation with a healthcare professional.

 

AIMS (Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale)

 

Persons taking any kind of antipsychotic medication need to be monitored for movement disorders. The AIMS (Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale) aids in the early detection of tardive dyskinesia as well as providing a method for on-going surveillance.

 

BPRS (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale)

 

Persons having or suspected of having schizophrenia or other psychotic disorder manifest the disorder in multiple ways. The BPRS assesses the level of 18 symptom constructs such as hostility, suspiciousness, hallucination, and grandiosity. It is particularly useful in gauging the efficacy of treatment in patients who have moderate to severe psychoses.

 

Bipolar Spectrum Diagnostic Scale (BSDS)


The Bipolar Spectrum Diagnostic Scale (BSDS) was developed by Ronald Pies, MD and was later refined and tested by S. Nassir Ghaemi, MD, MPH and colleagues. The BSDS arose from Pies’s experience as a psychopharmacology consultant, where he was frequently called on to manage cases of “treatment-resistant depression.” In Pies’s experience, most of these cases eventually proved to be undiagnosed bipolar spectrum disorder.

 

HAM-A (Hamilton Anxiety Scale)

 

This widely used interview scale measures the severity of a patient's anxiety, based on 14 parameters, including anxious mood, tension, fears, insomnia, somatic complaints and behavior at the interview. Developed by M.Hamilton in 1959, the scale predates, of course, the current definition of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). However, it covers many of the features of GAD and can be helpful also in assessing its severity.

 

HAM-D (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale)


The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale has proven useful for determining the level of depression before, during, and after treatment.

Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) and Brief Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9)

 

The Brief Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) is a 9-question version of the PHQ: 8 questions are scored on scale and 1 question on functional impairment. This screening instrument identifies depression and panic disorder and assesses stress and functionality, including gender-specific sources of stress.

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