Vol 32 No 7

Cultural Competence and LGBT Issues in Psychiatry

July 31, 2015

Because there is a higher prevalence of mental health disorders in LGBTs than in heterosexuals, psychiatrists should be broadly familiar with the process of sexual/gender exploration, psychological self-recognition, disclosure to others, and community identification.

Immigration and Post-Adolescent Psychology of Young Terrorists

July 30, 2015

Radicalization by Norwegian converts to the Prophet’s Ummah produced massive and terrible social consequences. The explanations offered may be pertinent to the current attraction that ISIS offers for too many young persons in many countries of the civilized world.

Contemporary ECT for Depression Part 1: Practice Update

July 30, 2015

This review covers recent advances in ECT technique, post-ECT management, and theories of mechanism of action. It will focus on the use of ECT in depression, the most common indication for ECT in clinical practice.

Intervention Helps Workers With Depression

July 30, 2015

In the US, depression ranks fifth in the number of disability-adjusted life years lost due to illness and employment problems often persist, even if help is sought. Helping those who want and/or need to work is part of providing comprehensive, patient-centered care.

Research That Can Change Clinical Practice in Psychotic Disorders

July 28, 2015

The need to stay up-to-date with the most current evidence-based information is becoming harder than ever. For this reason, the authors identify and evaluate published research that may have a direct bearing on clinical practice.

The 2015 International Congress on Schizophrenia Research

July 28, 2015

We are in the midst of a paradigm shift in the field, and new diagnostics and treatments that yield clinically significant improvement for the heterogeneous set of disorders known as schizophrenia are being developed.

Managing Ebola: An Archaeology of Disease

July 02, 2015

Playing helpless witness to a growing epidemic with no cure takes us back in time. The Hippocratics called it the “art” of medicine. It does not take a psychiatrist, however, to see that this “artful” approach frequently fails in public health crises.